Improving Diabetes Self-Care: The Effects of Telephone Education on Blood Glucose Monitoring

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Essay #: 069474
Total text length is 14,493 characters (approximately 10.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Improving Diabetes Self-Care: Will follow-up telephone calls improve blood glucose monitoring in patients with diabetes?
Diabetes is a common chronic disease that affects millions of people in Canada. Individuals affected with diabetes have to participate in self-care by monitoring their blood sugar levels to identify complications such as hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia and to respond appropriately to prevent adverse events. Education on self-management techniques such as monitoring blood sugar is provided through diabetes education courses in the community and during hospitalization. The results of a study by Peel, Douglas and Lawton show that some patients have problems monitoring their blood glucose levels. The purpose of this paper is...
The end:
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Statistics Canada (2010). Diabetes, 2009. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-625-x/2010002/article/11257-eng.htm
Tunis, S.L. & Minshall, M.E. (2008). Self-monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes: cost-effectiveness in the United States. American Journal of Managed Care, 14 (3), 131-40.