Human Social Identity and Group Distinctions as Human Nature

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Essay #: 064090
Total text length is 5,711 characters (approximately 3.9 pages).

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The beginning:
StudentFirstName StudentLastName
Professor FirstName LastName
Anthropology 123
12 November 2010
Human Social Identity and Group Distinctions as Human Nature
Social identity and group distinctions can be just as influential on human nature as biochemical and physiological forces. As an example, the notion of what constitutes appropriate behavior can be socially determined. "For a while, young women scorned the word girls, but that is cool again, probably because African-American women use it and can be real cool - even empowering - to whites to borrow black talk, the the word cool" (MacNeil 35). Thus, the “natural” inclination or disinclination to use the word girl can be radically altered by whether or not a group is influenced by...
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.....er have any utility and they would have never been published in the first place; people care enough to want egalitarianism.
Works Cited
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MacNeil, Robert. “Do You Speak American?.” Annual Editions:
Anthropology 10/11. Ed. Elvio Angeloni. Guilford, CT:
McGraw-Hill/Dushkin, 2009. 35-39. Print.
Whiteley, Peter. “Ties That Bind.” Annual Editions:
Anthropology 10/11. Ed. Elvio Angeloni. Guilford, CT:
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