Horror at Home and at War in “The Things They Carried” and “The Lottery”

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Essay #: 070307
Total text length is 9,418 characters (approximately 6.5 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Horror at Home and at War in “The Things They Carried” and “The Lottery”
The element of horror in American literature can take many forms. It can be used to illuminate the often terrifying truths that lurk behind the collective tyranny of social conformity that afflicts a community. It can also be used to demonstrate the daily terror that ordinary soldiers experience under the stress of combat and the threat of death. In Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” and Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried” readers can experience a common attitude toward the dehumanizing effects that social conformity can have on people in vastly different environments, the outwardly tranquil village and war in a distant land when taken to appalling extremes.
In her...
The end:
.....he Things They Carried” are striking, in their jaundiced look at conformity and the dangers that it can pose to the lives of ordinary people.
Bibliography
Chen, Tina. ""Unraveling the Deeper Meaning": Exile and the Embodied Poetics of Displacement in Tim O'brien's "the Things They Carried"." Contemporary Literature 39.1 (1998): 77-98. Print.
Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery." Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing. Ed. Roberts, Edgar V., and Zweig, Robert1948. 136-41. Print.
Nebeker, Helen E. ""The Lottery": Symbolic Tour De Force." American Literature 46.1 (1974): 100-08. Print.
O'Brien, Tim. "The Things They Carried." Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing. Ed. Roberts, Edgar V., and Zweig, Robert1990. 97-107. Print.