From Isolation to Death: Women’s Anguish in the Nineteenth Century

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Essay #: 061824
Total text length is 15,469 characters (approximately 10.7 pages).

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The beginning:
From Isolation to Death: Women’s Anguish in the Nineteenth Century
Women’s anguish in the nineteenth century harbors realities acutely described in classical literature. Kate Chopin’s The Story of an Hour and Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s The Lady of Shalott describe particular women’s anguish and self-inflicted intoxication that eventually results in the ultimate demise: death. Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper illustrated a similar theme with a woman descending into mental illness. Each short story and poem epitomize the social isolation many women in the nineteenth century endured; the mental anguish and affliction of repression. This paper will describe, compare, and contrast the isolation the women in each story suffered by...
The end:
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