Deep Sea Environments and the Ecological Approach

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Essay #: 051780
Total text length is 9,230 characters (approximately 6.4 pages).

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The beginning:
Deep Sea Environments and the Ecological Approach 
The biodiversity of deep sea environments is threatened by continuing unsustainable human activity. These environments are deteriorating because of exploitation by numerous stakeholders with conflicting interests and goals. Cramer (18) argues that powerful interests are targeting deep sea environments as a source of energy, a waste disposal site, and a testing ground for advanced military technologies. Explorations for new sources of energy are the primary sources of carbon dioxide injections into deep sea regions. 
Escartin
 and Porte (2711) maintain that although deep sea environments are marked by lack of sunlight, low temperatures, elevated pressures, and depths that exceed 1000...
The end:
.....ength)3] × 100; LSI = liver somatic index calculated as (liver weight/total weight) × 100. Values are mean ± SEM; number of organisms analyzed per station given in parentheses. 
bSample
 not available. (
Escartin
 & Porte). 
Table 2.  
Biliary
 Levels of FACs Expressed as 
BaP
 Equivalents (ng·mL-1) and Analyzed by HPLC-Fluorescence (380/430 nm)a
 
station 1
station 2
station 3 
C. 
guentheri
 
154.4 ± 12.6 
198.2 ± 13.3 
40.7 ± 5.5 
L. 
lepidion
 
40.6 ± 3.3 
33.2 ± 2.2 
31.4 ± 3.0 
M. 
moro
 
37.8 ± 2.1 
b 
b 
B. 
mediterraneus
 
28.6 ± 2.9 
b 
13.0 ± 1.3 
A. 
rostratus
 
95.5 ± 8.9 
193.9 ± 11.1 
15.4 ± 0.9
a Each sample is one pool of 6−10 organisms analyzed by triplicate. Results are expressed as mean ± SD. 
bSample
 not available.