Darwin, Malthus, and Survival

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Essay #: 063223
Total text length is 6,096 characters (approximately 4.2 pages).

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The beginning:
StudentFirstName StudentLastName
Professor FirstName LastName
History 123
16 October 2010
Darwin, Malthus, and Survival
Malthus posited the faulty notion that population was actually more influential than the natural environment in determining survival. The assertion made by Malthus was that "the power of the population is indefinitely greater than the power in the earth of produce subsistence for man" (131). However, this position goes against the logic posited by Darwin the natural environment actually plays a major role in determining how the “fittest” are determined.
Survival is not predicated simply on successful procreation or evidence of population. A measurable level of population has to exist over time. Dinosaurs are an excellent...
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.....caused by the members of the populations affected. There is no derisive critique intended regarding the positions of Malthus. Rather his viewpoints seemed somewhat narrow and perhaps motivated by socially-biased perspectives which could have been derived from his own prejudices. In any case, scientific realities show that population growth is a far more complicated equation.
Works Cited
Darwin, Charles. “Natural Selection.” Western Civilization:
Ideas, Politics, and Society Volume II: From 1600. Ed. Marvin Perry. Florence, KY: Cengage, 2008. 181-183. Print.
Malthus, Thomas. “On the Principle of Population.” Western
Civilization: Ideas, Politics, and Society Volume II: From 1600. Ed. Marvin Perry. Florence, KY: Cengage, 2008. 130-132. Print.