Contemporary Orientalism in U.S./ Eurocentric Cyberspace

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 067102
Total text length is 17,403 characters (approximately 12.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Contemporary Orientalism in U.S./ Eurocentric Cyberspace
When one enters the website “Japanisweird.com,” one is immediately struck by the sheer variety and number of images that are posted on the first page. The rows and rows of “weird” Japanese photographs, showing half-nude men, women eating “odd” foods, and larger-than-life popular culture figures are posted to be clicked on, enlarged, and then rated for their “weirdness” level. The heading at the very top of the “Japan is Weird” website reads, “We aren’t saying Japanese people are weird but it’s a fact that the strangest pictures floating around the internet are from Japan. Enjoy this collection of the weirdest Japanese
pics
and be sure to submit your own!” (JapanisWeird.com). How can...
The end:
..... text of Japan and Japanese culture.
Orientalism
remains, and indeed, lives anew in cyberspace with a Western viewership that still feels the need to define itself in contrast with the “weird,” and always distant, “other” represented by Japan.
Figure 1.
Works Cited
Said, Edward.
Orientalism
. New York: Vintage Books, 1978.
JapanisWeird.com. Retrieved 8 March 2011, <http://japanisweird.com/>
TheGreatGeekManual.com. Retrieved 8 March 2011, <http://thegreatgeekmanual.com/blog/>
Sharenator.com. Retrieved 8 March 2011, <http://www.sharenator.com/>
Motifake.com. Retrieved 8 March 2011, <http://www.motifake.com/>
Funnypictures.net.au/motivational. Retrieved 8 March 2011, <http://www.funnypictures.net.au/motivational/>