Compelling Narratives of Female Development in “A Woman” and “Cosima”

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Essay #: 069561
Total text length is 14,745 characters (approximately 10.2 pages).

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The beginning:
Compelling Narratives of Female Development in "A Woman" and "Cosima"
Part 1.
Sibilla
Alerarmo’s
A Woman and
Grazia
Deledda’s
Cosima
are compelling narratives of female development. In each novel there are enduring representations of patriarchy and male authority. They both offer revealing insights into the relationships between women. In both books, love and sexuality are also seen through the filter of the artist’s imagination when it is sensitized to women’s position in Italian life.
Patriarchy and male authority are of course central to novels with oppositional feminist themes.
Aleramo
throws her protagonist immediately into a dilemma for the reader by describing her child’s eye with regard to her parents. “The only thing that...
The end:
.....at could benefit the world.
In the case of the film and the short story, these are sly, fearless and honest works of art. They both demonstrate sensitivity to the oppression of women while not being especially gentle. This lack of kid gloves is in both cases critical to making their works more thought provoking. They also laudably point toward a larger male interest in peeling away the traditional ways of thinking that have oppressed women.
Bibliography
Aleramo
,
Sibilla
. A Woman. Berkley: University of California Press, 1980.
Bellocchio
, Marco. The Nanny. Rome: Accent Cinema, 1999.
Deledda,
Grazia
.
Cosima
. New York:
Italica
Press, 1988.
Pirandello. “The Wet Nurse.” Better Think Twice About It. New York: Books for Libraries Press, 1934.