Coming-of-Age: Culture, Gender, and Social Status

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Essay #: 062717
Total text length is 7,923 characters (approximately 5.5 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Coming-of-Age: Culture, Gender, and Social Status
Coming-of-Age is a universal moment. That is, all individuals will reach a point where a past conception of their-self is suddenly forfeited for new conception of their-self. The individual will realize that childhood has forever been left behind. It is a natural and inevitable moment. And yet, simply because it is a universal moment does not mean that it is universal in its particulars. Just as no one individual is the same, so too that no one individuals’ coming-of-age is the same. Some of the factors that are integral to one’s particular idea of coming-of-age are culture, gender, and social status. Three short stories will be explored in order to defend this contention. The first story,...
The end:
.....status (“What’s Bred in the Bone”). Thus the claim may be made that although coming-of-age is a universal occurrence, that universality is only to be understood in relation to the specific events of an individual’s life. Culture, gender, and social status are certainly not the only factors which influence the universal coming-of-age moment, but they are important ones.
Works Cited
Choy,
Wayson
. “The Jade Peony.” When We Were Young: A Collection of Canadian Short Stories. ---------. 102-123.
Davies, Robertson. “What’s Bred in the Bone.” When We Were Young: A Collection of Canadian Short Stories. ---------.
2-16.
Lawrence, Margaret. “Jericho’s Brick Battlements.” When We Were Young: A Collection of Canadian Short Stories. ---------. 403-414.