Coming Full Circle: One-Half Century of Canada’s Racist and Sexist Immigration Policy

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Essay #: 071404
Total text length is 6,886 characters (approximately 4.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Coming Full Circle: One-Half Century of Canada’s Racist and Sexist Immigration Policy
Canada’s international reputation is one of a multicultural society that has always welcomed and depended upon immigrants. For black Caribbeans, stories of exploitation and sexual abuse have peppered accounts of their immigrant experience ever since the first immigrant domestic worker scheme for black Caribbean women was instituted in 1955. Therefore, while Canada has clearly depended upon immigrant labor from the Caribbean, has it been the case that Canadian policy has been welcoming as well? This essay examines the claim that Canada’s immigration policy in the post-World War II era to the present can be characterized by race and gender discrimination....
The end:
..... Jamaica. This chapter was selected because it shows how the race and gender discrimination in immigration policy works to block entry and to send people back. It will be used in the fourth section to show how race and gender discrimination continues and has intensified since 1955.
Silvera, Makeda (1983). Hyacinth. In Silenced. Toronto: Williams-Wallace Publications, 61-70. This chapter details the trials of a woman named Hyacinth who emigrates from St. Lucia to Canada in the 1980s and is raped by her employer one month into her contract. This chapter was chosen because it is a personal narrative about the experiences of women immigrants. It will be used in a section on making black women’s experiences of immigration to Canada more visible.