Child and Adult Representations and the Theme of Suspicion in “Three Blind Mice” and “Oedipus the King”

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Essay #: 058548
Total text length is 7,531 characters (approximately 5.2 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Analysis of Child and Adult Representations and the Theme of Suspicion in “Three Blind Mice” by Agatha Christie and Oedipus the King by Sophocles
This study will analyze the child and adult representations and the theme of suspicion in “Three Blind Mice” by Agatha Christie and Oedipus the King by Sophocles. The childhood representations in Christie’s murder mystery portray a child’s nursery rhyme as the theme of suspicion that arises within a group of people that are all suspects in the Monkswell Manor murder. This theme of suspicion is also part of the adult crisis that Oedipus must confront over accusations accusing him of killing his father, dictating that the mythic oracle provides a similar context in which Christie relies on...
The end:
.....f an adult murderer within the household. In this way, the relationship between adult and childhood representations is founded on the theme of suspicion, which provide a fantastical childhood twist on the conflicts hat arise between adults in murder mystery stories in the writings of Agatha Christie and Sophocles. By understanding the representation of childhood and adult issues involving suspicion, these stories provide a context in which adults must come to understand their childhood in the solving of murder cases.
Works Cited:
Christie. Agatha. “Three Blind Mice.” (Customer please fill in the rest of bibliography, I only received a file of the text.)
Sophocles. Oedipus the King. Ed. Stephen Burg. Oxford: Oxford University Press US, 1988.