Character Portrayals in Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street”

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Essay #: 058459
Total text length is 7,043 characters (approximately 4.9 pages).

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The beginning:
Character Portrayals in Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street”
Herman Melville’s 1853 short story, “Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street,” tells the tale of a lawyer and his four employees. Three of the employees had worked under the lawyer, who is the narrator of this story, for some time before the action of the story begins. The last employee, Bartleby, becomes the focus of the lawyer’s tale because he was such an unusual employee, and the lawyer would later learn, overall individual. Bartleby was hired by the lawyer as a scrivener, or scribe, who would make copies of the various legal documents that the lawyer would need for his court dates and clients. Melville’s story was written and set in the...
The end:
.....ry that relies on closely-observed details about the ways in which each figure in the tale acts to build its narrative. Bartleby, as the title character of the story becomes especially important as the center of action, or inaction as the case is here. In looking at the development of each of the characters, however, it is important not to overlook the one character without a name, as he is probably the most important of them all: the lawyer-narrator. In describing his encounters with each of his employees, including the apathetic Bartleby, he reveals much about his own personality construction.
References
Melville, Herman. “Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street,” 1853. Retrieved 18 March 2010, <http://www.bartleby.com/129/>