Change in Mind and Body in Gogol and Akutagawa

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Essay #: 061972
Total text length is 7,732 characters (approximately 5.3 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Change in Mind and Body in Gogol and Akutagawa
Introduction
Russian novelist
Nikolay
Gogol and Japanese writer
Ryunosuke
Akutagawa
have at least one thing in common: they both penned a story that is titled “The Nose.” Gogol’s version concerns a young St Petersburg bureaucrat Major
Kovalyov
, who wakes up one morning only to find
himself
without a nose. He then chases from one city office to another in a desperate attempt to recover his nose. As in Gogol’s story,
Akutagawa’s
version which was originally called “
Hana
” is an amusing story of a priest whose nose is five or six inches long, and about his efforts to shorten his nose. The principal objective of this essay will then be to demonstrate the relationship between changes in the body...
The end:
.....entally interrelated and that characters can themselves change in response to changes in their surroundings or body.
Works Cited
Bowman,
Herber
E. “The Nose.” The Slavonic and East
European Review 31.76 (1952): 204-211.
Keene, Donald. Dawn to the West: Japanese Literature in the
Modern Era. New York: Holt: Rinehart and Winston, 1998.
Spycher
, Peter. C. “N.V. Gogol’s ‘The Nose’: A Satirical
Comic Fantasy Born of an Impotence Complex.
The Slavic and East European Journal 7.4 (1963): 3610374.
Wilson, Fred. Body, Mind, and Self in Hume’s Critical
Realism. Piscataway, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2008.
Zamora, Lois Parkinson and Wendy B
Faris
. (
eds
.). Magical
realism
: theory: history, community. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2005.