Canadian Democracy in a North American Context

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Essay #: 056075
Total text length is 13,388 characters (approximately 9.2 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
Nelson Wiseman argues that “[s]table countries seldom make radical institutional changes. They do not jump on bandwagons that cater willy-nilly to their era’s temperament” (Wiseman, 248). As such, the fundamental political principles of Canada have been shaped without the use of proportional representation and thus any reform, even insignificant, should be approached with caution (Wiseman, 248).
Hiemstra
and Jansen, in contrast, advocate for change within the Canadian political system. They criticize the current single-member plurality electoral system of the country in that it “rarely produces conditions in which this happens and thereby fails to reflect Canadians’ political opinions” (...
The end:
.....ortional representation system is in place is also persuasive. Yet, another compelling and significantly important argument against the implementation of proportional representation systems is
Fikete’s
essay on the relationship of consensus politics and race. It is indeed chilling to imagine another fascist regime in the face of a more democratic electorate system.
References
Blais
, A. &
Bodet
, M.A. “Does proportional representation foster closer congruence between citizens and policy makers?” Comparative Political Studies. 39 (2006): 1243-1260.
Fikete
, Liz. “Why we should say no to proportional
represenation
.” Race and Class. 40.4 (1999): 74-79.
Mithcell
,
Penni
. “Last word or not.”
Herizons
. 14.3 (2001). Academic Search Premier.