British Parliamentary, the U.S. Presidential and French Presidential-Parliamentary Systems

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Essay #: 053277
Total text length is 5,156 characters (approximately 3.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
British Parliamentary, the U.S. Presidential and French Presidential-Parliamentary Systems
Introduction
Comparative studies of governments reveal critical insights about the world of politics and government. The following discussion examines the differences between the British Parliamentary, The United States presidential, and French Presidential-parliamentary systems. Specifically, topics explored include the branches of government and the head of government.
The Branches of Government
The three branches of government in the British Parliamentary system, uniquely, are the Crown-in-Parliament (Sovereign), House of Lords and House of Commons. In theory, the Crown-in-Parliament refers to the power of the legislative power of the monarch...
The end:
.....e fact that the United States allows judicial review, however, makes the American system superior in terms of power balance.
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