Bernard William’s Argument of the Diversity of Integrity as “Moral Action”

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Essay #: 072778
Total text length is 13,923 characters (approximately 9.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Analysis of Bernard William’s Argument of the Diversity of Integrity as “Moral Action” in Countermanding Simple Act Utilitarianism for the Greater Good
This philosophical study will analyze the important diversity of moral action that Bernard Williams defines his argument against simple act utilitarianism in classical theory. Williams provides examples of the extension of subjective moral standards that often provide a more diverse array of factors linked with the artificiality of “objective” measurement found in act utilitarian principles. In simple act utilitarianism, the objective rationale for saving more lives by taking one life is only based on numeric or algorithmic properties, which make a moral discourse void as a consequence...
The end:
.....ore diversified reaction to such circumstances. This is how the moral actor can rely on integrity and ethical values to discern on the more complex realities of human interrelationships that arise when acting for the greater good. Williams provides these important arguments to prove the validity of moral action and integrity in the human condition through a rule utilitarianism over that of the simple act utilitarian beliefs of Mills, Kant, and Bentham.
Works Cited:
Ross, W.D. What Makes Right Acts Right? Twentieth Century Ethical Theory. Eds. Joram Graf Haber. New York: Prentice Hall, 1995: 87-104
Williams, Bernard. A Critique of Utilitarianism. Twentieth Century Ethical Theory. Eds. Joram Graf Haber. New York: Prentice Hall, 1995: 457-475.