Benjamin’s “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”

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Essay #: 053581
Total text length is 4,835 characters (approximately 3.3 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Benjamin’s “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”
Walter Benjamin’s seminal “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” discusses the notion of “aura” and how, in the time of photography and western’s society’s obsession with “getting closer” to an experience, the “aura” of a work of art deteriorates. This said, it is hard to contextualized the work of the Gutenberg bible within this framework because it is not a film or reproduction, and is handmade and in and of itself can be considered a work of art and not a reproduction in an artistic sense. It can be said that the Gutenberg Bible- or the forty two line bible- is in line with Benjamin’s idea that a reproduced artifact fades the “aura” of the object being...
The end:
.....nting press. In this way, though every bible isn’t identical, much of the “aura” is lost and its place and time in history marred by its engineering. The Gutenberg bible has a reproductive history making it aligned with Benjamin’s theory that a mechanically reproduced artifact fades the “aura” of the object being reproduced (more so than by hand), bringing the Gutenberg bible into the realm of mechanical reproduction, fading its “aura.”
Bibliography
Benjamin, Walter. “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” 1935.
Eisenstein, Elizabeth L. “The Advent of Printing and the Problem of the Renaissance.” Past & Present. 46.11 (1969): 19-89.
Goudsmit, S.A. “An Illiterate Scribe.” American Journal of Archaeology. 78.1 (1974): 78.