Belief, Free Speech and Liberal Political Theory

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 057193
Total text length is 5,889 characters (approximately 4.1 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Belief, Free Speech and Liberal Political Theory
This response will consider articles by Susan Hurley, “Bypassing Conscious Control: Media violence, unconscious imitation, and free speech,” and Daniel Gilbert,
Romin
Tafarodi
, and Patrick Malone’s “You Can’t Not Believe Everything You Read.” The specifics of the response will be formed through a focus on each articles conclusion on free speech within liberal political theory.
Hurley begins her discussion of free speech with three facts, proven as plausible through documented research, that: exposure to media violence increases aggressive behaviour that directly affects third parties, that imitations of violence may act through deliberate and conscious decisions by the individual, but also...
The end:
.....ing body to adjust and amend liberal theory, while Gilbert,
Tafordi
, and Malone suggest that free speech in the market-place is, and has been, the solution. Indeed, the latter article ends with the warning: “that unless we make the decision ourselves [in the market-place, concerning ideas], someone will gladly make it for us” (232). To be effective, Hurley must identify who this someone is.
Works Cited
Hurley, Susan. “Bypassing Conscious Control: Media violence, unconscious imitation, and free speech.” Does Consciousness Cause Behaviour? Ed. S.
Pockett
, Banks, and Gallagher. MIT Press, 2006.
Gilbert, Daniel,
Romin
Tafarodi
, and Patrick Malone. “You Can’t Not Believe Everything You Read.” Attitudes and Social Cognition -- (20--): -- - --.