Aristotle’s Arguments for Moral and Intellectual Virtue and the Modern Issue of Pornography

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Essay #: 057857
Total text length is 6,994 characters (approximately 4.8 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Analysis of Aristotle’s Arguments for Moral and Intellectual Virtue and the Modern Issue of Pornography
This philosophical study will analyze the moral virtue of Aristotle within the context of its meanings in the current debates about pornography in American society. By understanding the quote that Aristotle brings froth about the issue of ‘habit’ being the primary concern for a moral virtue, the debate over censorship and the moral vice of pornography continues to be a challenging topic in a discourse of this kind. By understanding Aristotle’s point of view, one can argue that the moral virtue of pornography is one reason it has not been banned in contrast to the intellectual virtue it often contradicts.
Aristotle was a classical...
The end:
.....objective means—one that seeks to find external reasoning to produce a set of variables that might determine the nature of right and wrong within any particular society. Certainly, Aristotle has produced an innovative and early approach to cause and effect on the issue of pornography that helps to deepen debates in modern society, which provides the two-fold subjective and objective basis in which moral and intellectual virtue can debate issues of this kind.
Works Cited
Aristotle. “Nicomachean Ethics.” Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 2009. 1 Mar. 2009 <http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/nicomachaen.html>.
Kipnis, Laura. Bound and Gagged: Pornography and the Politics of Fantasy in America. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1999.