Argument in Jackson’s “The Lottery” and Munro’s “Boys and Girls”

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Essay #: 054730
Total text length is 5,362 characters (approximately 3.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Argument in Jackson’s “The Lottery” and Munro’s “Boys and Girls”
Outline
Introduction
Thesis: In both Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” and Alice Munro’s “Boys and Girls,” society is described as emerging from, and relying upon, bloodshed perpetrated by a real or symbolic family with a patriarch at its head.
First argument: “The Lottery”
Although “The Lottery” depicts a seemingly senseless act of violence, it depicts the violence as providing an organizing purpose and identity for an entire community.
Second argument: “Boys and Girls”
As in “The Lottery,” Munro’s story emphasizes the way in which social order emerges from an acceptance of violence.
Conclusion.
Regardless of the origin of violence (with Munro connecting it to patriarchy and...
The end:
.....ce, both the stories suggest that, in order for violence to succeed as a way of ordering society, people must be taught passivity in the face of violence. Violence must become the norm, and people who reject violence must be taught that violence is an inevitable and natural as the weather. In this sense, the tragedy of both “The Lottery” and “Boys and Girls” is that the story’s protagonists fail to recognize, and reject, the patriarchal influence behind violence.
References
Jackson, S. The Lottery. The Mercury Reader: A Custom
Publication. M. Rubens. Toronto: Pearson Custom Publications, 2005. 45-53.
Munro, A. Boys and Girls. The Lottery. The Mercury Reader: A
Custom Publication. M. Rubens. Toronto: Pearson Custom Publications, 2005. 21-35.