Antigone: An Analysis of Psychological Motives

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Essay #: 053118
Total text length is 7,042 characters (approximately 4.9 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Antigone: An Analysis of Psychological Motives
The theme of pride is very evident in many ancient Greek plays, especially in Antigone, for even though Antigone and Creon are different in some ways, they are both strongly motivated by pride. Although pride was a trait despised by the gods, who often punished those who were easily offended because of excessive pride, the Greeks considered pride to be a necessity for greatness, and its effect on Antigone and Creon is comparable. Through his plot, theme, and characterization, Sophocles emphasized in this classic play that even though pride is necessary if one is to achieve greatness, it can also destroy them.
Antigone has excessive pride, which makes it difficult for her to overlook a real or...
The end:
..... and its effect on their conduct drives the plot and generates tragic consequences. They were both aware that pride was a trait despised by the gods, but they also considered pride to be a necessity for greatness.
Through her defiance of the king, Antigone engaged in an ancient form of civil disobedience. She was motivated by pride, just as the king was, but she was guided by morality as well, for she submitted to authority and was willing to accept punishment. Her suicide was tragic, but her death affirmed that defying authority has consequences which must be imposed for the greater long-term good of society.
Source
Barnet, Sylvan; Cain, William E.; and Burto, William E. An Introduction to Literature, 15th Edition. New York: Longman, 2008.