Ancient Roman Concrete Applications Vs. Concrete Construction Today

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Essay #: 061882
Total text length is 7,284 characters (approximately 5.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Ancient Roman Concrete Applications Vs. Concrete Construction Today
The builders of Imperial Rome made their handicrafts to last. Structures such as the Colosseum, the Pantheon and a variety of aqueducts some 20 centuries old remain mostly intact. They had little choice but to over-engineer them: their projects were on such a massive scale and used so much manpower that if they were to collapse shortly after construction, they would be hard-pressed to compel legions of workers to take on another project of similar size.
Some Roman works function today as they did when they were built. The Trevi Fountain in Rome is supplied water from an aqueduct built nearly 2,100 years ago. The Pons Fabricus, an arched bridge that spans the Tiber, remains...
The end:
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