Analysis of Selected Poetry

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Essay #: 069864
Total text length is 13,772 characters (approximately 9.5 pages).

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The beginning:
Analysis of Selected Poetry
Blake’s “The Lamb” uses couplets except for the word “Thee.” This appears first as a question repeated at the beginning and at the end of the first stanza, and then it reappears as a transition to the second stanza, and concludes the second stanza with confirming exclamation points. The structure helps make the point that Christians use lambs as a metaphor for the Christian flock, and as a lamb, a Christian would regard Jesus as another lamb. The use of “Thee” therefore becomes bleating allusion to the sound of domesticated animals.
Blake’s “The Tyger” uses couplets to lyrically paint a lyric monologue creating a frightening image of being in the dark woods with a tiger. How useless a spear would be in the woods...
The end:
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