Analysis of Four Major Concepts Advanced by the Chinese Buddhist School of Ch’an

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Essay #: 068710
Total text length is 12,668 characters (approximately 8.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Abstract
This paper shall analyze four key concepts of the Chinese Buddhist School Ch'an including that conviction that any human can achieve enlightenment by meditating and engaging in day-to-day tasks; the concept of mind-to-mind transmission; the belief in sudden versus gradual enlightenment; and some of the iconoclastic beliefs of the Ch'an tradition.
Analysis of Four Major Concepts Advanced by the Chinese Buddhist School of Ch'an
The Buddhist School of Ch'an began in China in the fifth century and then spread slowly throughout Japan and Central Asia.  When Ch'an reached Japan it metamorphosed into the modern-day version of Zen Buddhism. Buddhist historian Gary Ray (1993) contends that even though Ch'an can no longer be called a living...
The end:
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Yen, S. (2011) “Chan practice and belief.” Dharma Drum Mountain Buddhist Association of Australia. Retrieved from
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