An Analysis of Three Short Stories from the Book, “Literature: Approaches to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama”

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Essay #: 069051
Total text length is 9,768 characters (approximately 6.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Analysis of Three Short Stories From the Book, 
“Literature: Approaches to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama”
Story One: “The Prodigal Son” by Luke
 “The Prodigal Son” by Luke made me react in a way that feels understanding for all three characters, and compassion for the younger son who has to come back home after blowing his fortune, the father for providing a great deal of understanding and not judgment, and the older son for working his way through his anger toward his brother. There is a lot of evidence in the story that makes me feel this way that will be described below. 
First, when I was reading the first paragraph, I realized that the younger son was going to have a chance to have a great life after he gets his share of his father’s...
The end:
..... her daughter up, rightly so (486), and her mother’s temporary disconcern for her when she talked back to her mother (487). Ultimately, then, this is a story about complicated relationships between mother and daughter and how even the best intentions of a parent can create a lot of pain between the two. 
Works Cited
Luke, “The Prodigal Son.” in DiYanni, Robert. “Literature: Approaches to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama, 2nd edition,” 2006. New York: McGraw Hill.
Tan, A. “Rules of the Game.” in DiYanni, Robert. “Literature: Approaches to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama, 2nd edition,” 2006. New York: McGraw Hill.
Updike, J. “A & P.” in DiYanni, Robert. “Literature: Approaches to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama, 2nd edition,” 2006. New York: McGraw Hill.