An Analysis of Hamlet’s Societal Isolation as a Moral Cause for Governmental Rebellion

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Essay #: 059463
Total text length is 5,267 characters (approximately 3.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Analysis of Hamlet’s Societal Isolation as a Moral Cause for Governmental Rebellion
In beginning, when Hamlet begins to reflect on the validity of socially isolating himself from his dead father’s brother, he is clearly seeking to understand if rebellion is legally and morally warranted. After Claudius has killed Hamlet’s father, the secrecy of Hamlet’s actions in seeking his assassination are illegal and unwarranted under royal law. This passage reflects Hamlet’s emotional reasons of attempting to commit rebellion against Claudius though his cousin, Fortinbras, who legally solves his conflicts by committing to war against his enemies (Bloom 45). Hamlet initiates this debate in his soliloquy as he reflects the problems of his secret...
The end:
.....e throne. These factors define the societal isolation as a necessity for Hamlet’s use of illegal means as a moral justification for governmental rebellion against Claudius.
Works Cited:
Bloom, Harold. William Shakespeare: Modern Critical Interpretations. New York: Chelsea House Publications, 2004.
Bolt, Sydney. Shakespeare: Hamlet. New York Penguin, 1999.
Grady, Hugh. The Modernist Shakespeare: Critical Texts in a Material World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994.
Kinney, Arthur, F. Hamlet: Critical Essays. New York/London: Routledge, 2001.
Shakespeare, William. The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare. 2010. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. April 14, 2010. <http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/hamlet/>