A Summary of “The Making of the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940-1960”

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Essay #: 062955
Total text length is 10,018 characters (approximately 6.9 pages).

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The beginning:
A Summary of The Making of the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940-1960
In Arnold Hirsch’s The Making of the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940-1960, the foreword brings the reader up to the present tense (1998). After nearly 15 years since the book was originally published, it was obvious that Hirsch had to up date the concurring federal and state issues involving poverty and in the development of housing for blacks as a trend into the modern era. For instance, he describes the routine encroachment of the federal government (which is mentioned on a lesser degree in the first edition) that worked in collusion with local cities to prevent good housing for African Americans (Hirsch ix). Also historical contingency...
The end:
.....ghetto housing, but ore so, to sustain a racial barrier between whites that were fearful of blacks as their neighbors in housing units as “it was almost impossible to attract white” to apartment complexes or housing developments” (Hirsch 261). In many ways, white developers and other real estate moguls assured white tenets that there would be this security in racial division. This is, the primary organization of Hirsch’s commentary on the problem of racism in America, especially in light of Chicago’s example of racism during this period of history in building the “second ghetto” in this part of the nation.
Works Cited
Hirsch, Arnold. Making the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago 1940-1960. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press, 1998.