A Streetcar Named Desire: Convention and Circumstance

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Essay #: 060306
Total text length is 5,263 characters (approximately 3.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
A Streetcar Named Desire: Convention and Circumstance
Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire is a play about conflict. Its two principal characters, Blanche and Stanley, are in constant battle: Blanche’s commitment to moral convention provokes Stanley’s anger and disgust. Stanley is a character defined by his passion and is thus unwilling and unable to identify with Blanche’s restraint. Between these two polar opposites is Stella, sister to Blanche, and wife of Stanley. She must find a middle ground between passion and convention. All these characters are shaped by the unique circumstances of their situation; and their dealing with convention under trying circumstances is reflective of one of the play’s major thematic concerns: that...
The end:
..... lack of a moral stance. There is no clear line to indicate when passion has gone too far. Although the rape scene certainly suggests this, Williams is hesitant to make any final judgement on Stanley or his passion.
Works Cited
Falk,
Signi
. “The Southern Gentlewoman.” Twentieth Century Interpretations of A Streetcar Named Desire. Ed. Jordan Miller. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1971. 94-103.
Riddell, Joseph. “A Streetcar Named Desire – Nietzsche Descending.” Twentieth Century Interpretations of A Streetcar Named Desire. Ed. Jordan Miller. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1971. 80-90.
Tischler
, Nancy. Tennessee Williams. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2000.
Williams, Tennessee. A Streetcar Named Desire. New York: New Directions Books, 1947.