A Qualitative Analysis of the Relationship Between Language and Social Identity

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Essay #: 064983
Total text length is 17,778 characters (approximately 12.3 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
A Qualitative Analysis of the Relationship Between Language and Social Identity:
Topic One, Set B: Mixed Sex Talk (Extracts 4,5,6)
Introduction and Overview of Chosen Data Set
Men and women, it has been researched, “choose their words differently” (Coulmas 36) and have innate differences in voice pitch, which affects conversational and linguistic tendencies on many different variables. Gender roles, and the development of gender-specific communication styles and conversational styles have roots in both environmental developmental factors and gender-specific cognitive factors. A clear sense of gender-specific conversational analysis can be achieved when examining data sets that represent three distinct linguistic conversations: First, a...
The end:
.....r groups and in mixed-gender groups.
Works Cited
Anderson, Kristin J. & Campbell Leaper. “Emotion Talk Between Same- and Mixed-Gender Friends.” Journal of Language and Social Psychology. 17.4 (1998): 419-448.
Coulmas, Florian. Sociolinguistics: The Study of Speakers’ Choices. (2006). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Davies, Alan & Catherine Elder. The Handbook of Applied Linguistics. (2004). New York: Wiley Blackwell.
Eckert, Penny. “Communities of Practice, Identity, Style and Personae.” Stanford University Webpage. (2010). http://www.stanford.edu/~eckert/csofp.html
Mulac, Anthony. “Men’s and Women’s Talk in Same-Gender and Mixed-Gender Dyads: Power or Polemic? Journal of Language and Social Psychology. 8.3-4 (1989): 249-270.