A Critique of Motloch’s “Moral Rules”

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Essay #: 070585
Total text length is 7,888 characters (approximately 5.4 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Social Responsibility and Design: A Critique of Motloch’s “Moral Rules”
The chapter “Moral Rules” in Harvey
Motloch’s
Where Stuff Comes From: How Toasters, Toilets, Cars, Computers and Many Other Things Came to Be As They Are makes several interesting points about consumption, consumerism, production, the non-inevitability of the ways things are, and the possibility of making changes that will make the world more economically equitable and ecologically sound.
This paper will argue that a majority of Motloch’s work is a useful tool for framing one’s perspective regarding design thinking. Designers literally shape the world around us and have the capability of changing the landscape for the better by creating innovative products, ideas, and...
The end:
.....: How Toasters, Toilets, Cars, Computers and Many Other Things Came to Be As They Are is intriguing, especially in the way that it offers counterpoints to our habitual ways of thinking. As a designer it inspired me to think about what he said about designing products to decompose more quickly. In our lifetimes we are going to run out of landfill space so it is good to think about doing more with less and coming up with innovative solutions to contend with the environmental challenges that lie ahead for designers of the twenty first century.
References
Motloch, Harvey. “Moral Rules.” In Where Stuff Comes From: How Toasters, Toilets, Cars, Computers and Many Other Things Come To Be As They Are. New York & London:
Routledge
, 2005. 225-59.