A Comparative Account of Aeschylus’ “Agamemnon” and Euripides’ “Iphigenia at Aulis”

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Essay #: 063729
Total text length is 24,432 characters (approximately 16.8 pages).

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The beginning:
Politics and Sacrifice: A Comparative Account of Aeschylus’ Agamemnon and Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis
A solemn farewell ends Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis: “You brought me into the light, gave me life, for Greece./ So I die for Greece, with no regret” (1993, p. 88). And with these words, the young daughter of Agamemnon – Iphigenia – embraces her own sacrificial death. There is something about this particular death that both attracted and repelled the Greek imagination: attracted, in that, several tragedies were written on the sacrifice from the house of
Atreus
; and repelled, in that, there is never any definitive conclusion on the justness of the sacrifice. The myth, depending on the particular text referenced, may be construed as...
The end:
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