Fortune in Classical Literature: An Analysis

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Essay #: 073058
Total text length is 5,844 characters (approximately 4.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Fortune in Classical Literature: An Analysis
Introduction
Comparing the idea of fortune in “The Consolation of Philosophy“, in Theban plays such as “Oedipus the King“, and in the “Book of Job” indicates that all of these classical texts present fortune as something that cannot be escaped or avoided. Boethius, Sophocles, and Job all emphasize that divinity controls the fortunes of all human beings and of the universe itself. We must accept what happens to us, reject the idea that we can control our own destiny, and submit ourselves to divine will.
The Role of Fortune
When Boethius wrote “The Consolation of Philosophy” while in prison waiting to be executed, his own experiences with fortune directly shaped how he presented...
The end:
.....ipus the King” reveals that fortune is beyond our control. Boethius, Sophocles, and Job all present the common theme that divinity controls the fortunes of all human beings and of the universe itself. We must accept fortune, for it is not something we can escape or avoid, it is something that we must face and acknowledge as divine will.
Sources
Boethius. (2011). “The Consolation of Philosophy.” Beck.org. Online. Available: http://www.san.beck.org/Boethius1.html. 6 December 2011.
Sophocles. (2011). “Oedipus the King.” Viu.ca. Online. Available: http:// records.viu.ca/~johnstoi/sophocles/oedipustheking.htm. 6 December 2011.
“The Book of Job.” (2006). EBible.org. Online. Available: http://ebible. org/kjv/Job.htm. 6 December 2011.