Thoreau on Living a Whole Human Life

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Essay #: 062990
Total text length is 5,397 characters (approximately 3.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Thoreau on Living a Whole Human Life
Introduction
In the last chapter of Walden, Henry David Thoreau writes: “What youthful philosophers and experimentalists we are! There is not one of my readers who has yet lived a whole human life . . . We know not where we are” (Thoreau 322).
This statement reflects Thoreau’s awareness of the superficial nature of modern society and his belief that living a meaningful life requires focusing on what is really important, rejecting materialism, and developing a much deeper appreciation for nature and the spiritual aspects of life.
Living a Whole Life
Thoreau believed that living a whole life entails leaving behind the trappings of modern society and returning to nature. During his years at Walden...
The end:
.....eaders had yet lived a whole human life demonstrates his understanding of the superficial nature of modern society and culture and his belief that living a meaningful life requires recognizing what is really important, turning away from materialism, and cultivating a much deeper appreciation for the natural world and the spiritual aspects of life.
Bibliography
Thoreau, Henry David. Walden: A Fully Annotated Edition. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004.
_ _ _. “Spiritual Laws.” In Essays: First Series. Emerson Central. Online. Available: http://emersoncentral.com/spirituallaws.htm. 8 October 2010.
Toews, Rockford E. “One Less Accountant.” Thoreau Eserver. Online. Available: http:// thoreau.eserver.org/oneless.html. 8 October 2010.